Publications

The Lincy Institute — Issue Brief Social Services No. 8, Implementation Science and Fidelity Measurement: A Test of the 3-5-7 Model™ (Denby et al., 2017)

 

Children and youths engaged with the child welfare system can experience grief and loss as a result of trauma, broken relationships, and inadequate attachments. Interventionists are often challenged to implement effective strategies that help youths to reestablish trusting relationships and to promote overall psychological well-being. A 5-year federal demonstration project funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children’s Bureau, guided by an implementation science model, sought to increase well-being in youths age 12–21 who were involved in the child welfare system. The 3-5-7 Model™, a strengths-based approach that empowers children, youths, and families to engage in grieving and integrating significant relationships, was studied. A fidelity system was created in order to test the model. Important lessons about implementation science guided the work of the demonstration project. Although definitive conclusions could not be reached, several indicators of psychological well-being were found to be associated with high levels of fidelity to the 3-5-7 Model™. Suggestions for future research are offered.

To read the full report click here

 

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The Lincy Institute — Issue Brief Social Services No. 7, Making a “Big” Impact in Child Welfare: The Challenges and Successes of Mentoring Foster Youths (Gomez & Latham, 2017)

 

This report examines the implementation challenges of a federal demonstration project in pairing mentors with current and former foster youths. In addition, we present results of a satisfaction survey administered to matched foster youths. Survey results revealed that foster youths felt satisfied with their assigned mentors, and they showed high levels of connectedness and engagement in their relationships.

to read the full report click here

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The Lincy Institute — Issue Brief Social Services Series No. 6 The Importance of Parenting Education for Teenage Parents in Foster Care (Closson & Tonogan, 2017)

 

Teen pregnancy has been linked with socioeconomic disadvantage (Bissell, 2000), increased maternal mortality (Nove, Matthews, Neal, & Camacho, 2014), and poor child outcomes (Chen et al., 2007). The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancies (2015) reports that youth in foster care are nearly twice as likely to become pregnant compared with youths in the general population. The disparities faced by youths in the foster care system call for focused work in the area of sexual health and pregnancy prevention and this brief reports on some of those issues.

To read the full report click here
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The Lincy Institute — Issue Brief Social Services Series No.5_Implementation of a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program for Youth in Foster Care (Davidson & Brogdon, 2017)

 

In 2012, the Clark County Department of Family Services (DFS) was awarded funding from the Administration of Children and Families Children’s Bureau to implement the Determined, Responsible, and Empowered Adolescents Mentoring Relationships (DREAMR) project. One of the goals of the multifaceted DREAMR project was to reduce pregnancy among foster care youths and build relationship capacity for youths already pregnant or parenting. This brief examines the implementation of a Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) evidence-based curriculum in child welfare. Findings from the program intervention are also presented.

To read the full report click here
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The Lincy Institute — Issue Brief Social Services Series No. 4_Public Child Welfare and a Multi-Agency Collaborative: Lessons Learned From the DREAMR Project (Tudor, Gomez, & Denby, 2017)

 

This issue brief explores the benefits and challenges associated with an inter-agency partnership  carried out through a federally funded, five-year demonstration project. Reported in this brief are some of the strategies used to overcome implementation barriers and to promote project success. Also, described are the results of an implementation evaluation. Collaborative members assessed the project on its overall effectiveness in meeting indicators of success, including: youth involvement, adherence to program goals, involvement of all partners, accountability, communication, and stakeholder satisfaction. Implications and strategies for promoting inte-ragency collaborations in the context of child welfare are offered.

To read the full report click here
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The Lincy Institute — Issue Brief Social Services Series No. 3_Becoming “SMART” About Relationship Building: Foster Care Youth and the Use of Technology (Denby-Brinson, Gomez, & Alford, 2015)

 

This brief presents an implementation study of a smartphone service for foster youth involved in the federal demonstration project DREAMR. The research team conducted a series of focus groups and in-depth interviews with foster youth, foster parents and relative caregivers, and service providers in order to better understand the successes and challenges of the service. Additionally, a smartphone survey was administered to foster youth. The study results suggest positive aspects associated with the use of smartphones including and not limited to: relationship building, youth’s increased sense of normalcy, and youth empowerment. Barriers encountered during service implementation relate to technological limitations and other problems that emerged from the lack of stakeholder engagement.

To read the full report click here

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